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Sociology Doctoral Program

Application Deadline: 18 March 2024

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The Sociology Doctoral Program at the Corvinus University of Budapest aims to assist motivated students to carry out problem-oriented, theoretically grounded and methodologically sound empirical social research. The Doctoral Program prepares its students for the international labor market. In order to develop the careers of our students, the organized doctoral training is conducted in English. The training program is full-time and lasts eight semesters. In addition to the continuous research work, course work must also be carried out in the first two years. The first two academic years end with the comprehensive exam focusing on the defence of the research plan. In the second phase of the trainingalso four semestersstudents work exclusively on their research and dissertation. The dissertation must be submitted for defense within three years after passing the comprehensive exam. The language of the dissertation must be English.    

Corvinus University of Budapest

Dr. Tamás Bartus

Head of Doctoral Program

Corvinus University of Budapest

Dr. Zsuzsanna Elekes

Head of Doctoral School

“Taking academic knowledge into the industry”

The PhD story of Aleksandra Zivanovic

"In the doctoral programme, you are more than just a student"

the PhD story of Alexandra Bagi

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Why the sociology doctoral program?

Given our vast experiences on the progress of doctoral students, the key feature of the sociology doctoral program is a strong focus on supporting the doctoral research and minimizing coursework in the usual sense. All courses focus on developing research skills.

The mandatory courses include 

• the series of research seminars (one course per semester) devoted to reviewing the literature, formulating research questions and developing the research plan. 

• one course discussing good and questionable practices of theorizing and empirical research 

Students should take at least three elective classes. We offer courses in both quantitative and qualitative research and data analysis methods. Students are free to select other courses from the offers of other doctoral programs and even summer schools instead. 

Continuous work on the doctoral research is a must. Students are expected to 

• meet the supervisor(s) on a weekly basis 

• submit a progress report at the end of every semester, which includes a workplan for the prospective semester 

• present their progress before their supervisors and peers at the doctoral research forum held each semester 

• present at conferences and work on and publish papers 

Admissions

General information

• Applicants are required to submit a research plan in the English language. The oral interviews are conducted in English. 

• The expected length of the research plan to be submitted during application: a minimum of 10,000, but not more than 20,000 characters including references. 

• If an applicant selects both tracks, the Head of the DS and the Admission Boards shall decide which track is competent to conduct the admission procedure. If both tracks are deemed competent, the applicant may participate in both admission procedures. In that case the applicant may submit two research plans. 

The Admission Board of each track shall: 

• review and evaluate past achievements documented in the application materials (educational achievements, research experience, publication output, whether the completed education matches the track); 

• review and evaluate the submitted research plan (maturity, relevance of research topic, whether it matches the doctoral track’s professional profile); 

• conduct face-to-face or online interviews as means to assess the language skills, communication skills and professional competence of each applicant. 

Evaluation criteria of the admission exam ​

CriteriaMaximum points
Prior achievement
Masters education / professional experience consistent with knowledge and competence expected by the Doctoral School 10
Former research experience, publications10
Research plan
Quality and elaborateness / detailedness of document20
Appropriateness of research concept in regard to the announced subjects and researches of the Doctoral School 10
Feasibility and relevance of research 10
Interview
English language and professional communication skills 20
Performance during oral examination (competence, debating skills, independence, flexibility) 20

Supervisors

  • Dr. Tamás  Bartus 
  • Dr. Zsuzsanna Elekes 
  • Dr. Borbála Göncz  
  • Dr. György Lengyel 
  • Dr. László Letényi 
  • László Lőrincz   
  • Dr. Attila Meleg  
  • Prof. Dr. Beáta Nagy 
  • Dr. Adél Pásztor 
  • Ivett Szalma 
  • Prof. Dr. Zoltán Oszkár Szántó  
  • Dr. Lilla Mária Vicsek  
  • Culture matters: Cultural components in social stratification – Luca KRISTÓF
  • Why do elites fail? Empirical studies of local and national political, economic and cultural elites – Luca KRISTÓF
  • Should I Stay or Should I Go? Elite grammar school students’ choosing between elite universities at home or abroad – Adél PÁSZTOR
  • Post-doctorates: Another Stage in the Academic Pipeline? – Adél PÁSZTOR
  • Moving up or moving away? East-European PhD holders in the European academic workforce – Adél PÁSZTOR
  • Current social trends in Europe. Lessons from the European Social Survey (ESS) – Bence SÁGVÁRI
  • Computational Social Science in action: exploring human behavior from digital traces –  Bence SÁGVÁRI
  • Social perception of the new digital world: attitudes and expectations towards artificial intelligence and related technologies – Bence SÁGVÁRI
  • Expectations around artificial intelligence and robotics and the role of these projections in the present – Lilla VICSEK
  • Framing, Identity and Social Attitudes – Béla JANKY
  • Adolescents at risk: Nature and reasons of risk behaviours, leisure time activities, health consciousness of young people – Zsuzsanna ELEKES
  • Gender, organization and management – Beáta NAGY
  • Gender and academia: Is gender equality in science being achieved? – Beáta NAGY
  • Do educational hierarchies shape parenting strategies and fertility intentions? – Tamás BARTUS
  • How do social norms and reputation support cooperation? – Károly TAKÁCS and Szabolcs SZÁMADÓ
  • Educational hierarchies, family practices and fertility – Tamás BARTUS
  •  
  • Culture matters: Cultural components in social stratification – Luca KRISTÓF
  • Why do elites fail? Empirical studies of local and national political, economic and cultural elites – Luca KRISTÓF
  • Should I Stay or Should I Go? Elite grammar school students’ choosing between elite universities at home or abroad – Adél PÁSZTOR
  • Post-doctorates: Another Stage in the Academic Pipeline? – Adél PÁSZTOR
  • Moving up or moving away? East-European PhD holders in the European academic workforce – Adél PÁSZTOR
  • Current social trends in Europe. Lessons from the European Social Survey (ESS) – Bence SÁGVÁRI
  • Computational Social Science in action: exploring human behavior from digital traces –  Bence SÁGVÁRI
  • Social perception of the new digital world: attitudes and expectations towards artificial intelligence and related technologies – Bence SÁGVÁRI
  • Expectations around artificial intelligence and robotics and the role of these projections in the present – Lilla VICSEK
  • Framing, Identity and Social Attitudes – Béla JANKY
  • Adolescents at risk: Nature and reasons of risk behaviours, leisure time activities, health consciousness of young people – Zsuzsanna ELEKES
  • Gender, organization and management – Beáta NAGY
  • Gender and academia: Is gender equality in science being achieved? – Beáta NAGY
  • Do educational hierarchies shape parenting strategies and fertility intentions? – Tamás BARTUS
  • How do social norms and reputation support cooperation? – Károly TAKÁCS and Szabolcs SZÁMADÓ
  • Educational hierarchies, family practices and fertility – Tamás BARTUS

Alumni

Boróka Pápay (2020): THE PURPOSE AND TYPES OF ORGANIZATIONAL GOSSIP 

Nóra Teller (2020): Trapped in One’s Own Housing. The Limitations of Housing Choices in Segregated Neighborhoods 

Márta Radó (2019): Tracking the effects of life events on subjective well-being 

Mounia Utzeri (2018) A chance or a trap? Understanding gender equality schemes in management. 

Ildikó Dén-Nagy (2018): Problem solver or private life killer? Mobile Telephony and Work-life Balance in Hungary. 

Bálint Néray (2017): Relational Integration as The Analysis of Friendship, Negative Ties and Ethnic Identity Among Adolescents 

Nikolett Geszler (2016): Work-Family Conflict of Hungarian Manager Fathers 

Dorottya Kisfalusi (2016): Interethnic Relations among Roma and Non-Roma Students in Hungary 

Judit Pál (2016): Status and Negative Ties: A Longitudinal Network Study among Adolescents 

Julianna Faludi (2016): Innovation Patterns In the Design-Driven Industries: Opening Up The Made In Italy. Doktori (PhD) értekezand, Budapesti Corvinus Egyetem, Szociológia Doktori Iskola. 

Hanna Kónya (2013): The emergence of a transnational elite. A methodological approach for the definition and identification of the Csángó elite… 

Eszter Bakonyi (2012): To trust or not to trust. Trust Towards Democratic Institutions in Central and Eastern Europe after the Regime Change in 1989-1990 – with a Special Focus on Hungary 

Attila Gulyás (2012): A friendly offer – fairness and social embeddedness 

2022 

Zsanna Nyírő (2022): THE EFFECT OF EDUCATIONAL UPWARD MOBILITY ON HABITUS 

Veronika Paksi (2022): PHD AND CHILDBEARING? WORK-LIFE BALANCE OF FEMALE PHD STUDENTS IN THE FIELD OF ENGINEERING 

Kitti Kutrovátz (2021): INTENSIVE PARENTING PERSPECTIVES ON PARENTAL TIME AND MEDIATION OF TECHNOLOGY USE 

2021 

Boglárka Herke (2021): WELFARE DESERVINGNESS PERCEPTIONS OF SINGLE MOTHERS IN HUNGARY: INSTITUTIONAL DESIGN, GOVERNMENT DISCOURSE, AND PUBLIC ATTITUDES 

Zsófia Bauer (2021): NARRATED EXPERIENCES OF MEDICALLY ASSISTED REPRODUCTION IN HUNGARY 

Gergely Horzsa (2021): RURAL DEVELOPMENT AND MIGRATION – EFFECTS OF RURAL DEVELOPMENT PROJECTS ON INTERNAL MIGRATION AND MIGRATION ASPIRATIONS OF RURAL DWELLERS IN HUNGARY 

Ákos Bocskor (2021): INFORMAL STATUS AMONG HUNGARIAN EARLY ADOLESCENTS. POPULARITY, COOLNESS, AND ACCEPTANCE FROM A MIXED METHODS PERSPECTIVE 

Bence Kováts (2021): BECOMING (IN)DEPENDENT. TRENDS AND DETERMINANTS OF PARENTAL SUPPORT IN HOUSING ACCESS IN HUNGARY 

Boróka Pápay (2020): THE PURPOSE AND TYPES OF ORGANIZATIONAL GOSSIP 

Nóra Teller (2020): Trapped in One’s Own Housing. The Limitations of Housing Choices in Segregated Neighborhoods 

Márta Radó (2019): Tracking the effects of life events on subjective well-being 

Mounia Utzeri (2018) A chance or a trap? Understanding gender equality schemes in management. 

Ildikó Dén-Nagy (2018): Problem solver or private life killer? Mobile Telephony and Work-life Balance in Hungary. 

Bálint Néray (2017): Relational Integration as The Analysis of Friendship, Negative Ties and Ethnic Identity Among Adolescents 

Nikolett Geszler (2016): Work-Family Conflict of Hungarian Manager Fathers 

Dorottya Kisfalusi (2016): Interethnic Relations among Roma and Non-Roma Students in Hungary 

Judit Pál (2016): Status and Negative Ties: A Longitudinal Network Study among Adolescents 

Julianna Faludi (2016): Innovation Patterns In the Design-Driven Industries: Opening Up The Made In Italy. Doktori (PhD) értekezand, Budapesti Corvinus Egyetem, Szociológia Doktori Iskola. 

Hanna Kónya (2013): The emergence of a transnational elite. A methodological approach for the definition and identification of the Csángó elite… 

Eszter Bakonyi (2012): To trust or not to trust. Trust Towards Democratic Institutions in Central and Eastern Europe after the Regime Change in 1989-1990 – with a Special Focus on Hungary 

Attila Gulyás (2012): A friendly offer – fairness and social embeddedness 

2021 

Gergely Horzsa (2021): RURAL DEVELOPMENT AND MIGRATION – EFFECTS OF RURAL DEVELOPMENT PROJECTS ON INTERNAL MIGRATION AND MIGRATION ASPIRATIONS OF RURAL DWELLERS IN HUNGARY 

Ákos Bocskor (2021): INFORMAL STATUS AMONG HUNGARIAN EARLY ADOLESCENTS. POPULARITY, COOLNESS, AND ACCEPTANCE FROM A MIXED METHODS PERSPECTIVE 

Bence Kováts (2021): BECOMING (IN)DEPENDENT. TRENDS AND DETERMINANTS OF PARENTAL SUPPORT IN HOUSING ACCESS IN HUNGARY 

Be informed!

Subscribe to our newsletter to automatically receive the latest information on further education and admissions!

Contact

Please make an appointment by email before a personal consultation!

Corvinus University of Budapest

Dr. Tamás Bartus

Head of Doctoral Program

Corvinus University of Budapest

Marcell Kiss

Doctoral Study and Administration Expert

Corvinus University of Budapest

Dr. Zsuzsanna Elekes

Head of Doctoral School

Corvinus University of Budapest

László Kálmán

PhD procedures expert - dissertation submission and defence

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GEN.:2024.02.29. - 02:47:36